A Philosophical Barbarian

A little place on the internet for my deviating thoughts.

asylum-art:

Lana Sutra for United Colors of Benetton by Erik Ravelo
The global brand has successfully fulfilled an experimental project, created by a young Cuban artist at Fabrica, Erik Ravelo.
On the 6th of September of 2011, UCB hosted the simultaneous event in their three concept stores in Istanbul, Milan and Munich, as well as on the web for worldwide audiences, as they presented a series of 15 art installations signed by the artist, symbolizing the brand’s DNA spirit of unity in diversity.
The 15 installations of Lana Sutra are created as homage to the spirit of love that embodies our connection as one race and our strength as one unit, as well it also dedicated to the desire for an equal and sharing society. The project’s visuals are based on the famous Indian literature Kama Sutra, with the word Kama replaced by Lana, the Italian and Spanish word for wool, and sutra that means a thread which unites.
The installations represent sculptures of human couple that are made of clay and colorful woolen threads, uniting them and merging the bodies one to another as a symbol of unity when the different colors meet, which the colors itself are chosen from the brand’s shades of Fall Winter 2011-2012 collection ready to purchase at UCB local stores worldwide.

http://www.erik-ravelo.com
http://www.benetton.com

(via asylum-art)

asylum-art:

The Photograph Art of Thorsten Brinckmann: “Serial Collector”

We have seen images of German-based Thorsten Brinkmann’s work in the past, but we hadn’t fully understood how big his body of work was. The element of old mastery style portraits is what initially makes the work familiar, but of course, what is going on in the photographs is something conceptual and not typical in the least.

The still-life portraits contain objects from Brinkmann’s collection, from which he calls himself a “serial collector.” A here is the kicker: Thorsten Brinkmann photographs himself in these scenes and costumes. And of course, the absence of the face is a powerful characteristic in all of these photographs.

(via asylum-art)

“Lie down and look up at the ceiling and breathe with those curiously fragile lungs of yours and remind yourself: Don’t worry. Don’t worry. All is as it was meant to be. It was meant to be lonely and terrifying and unfair and heaving. Don’t worry.”

—   The Faceless Old Woman Who Secretly Lives in Your Home, Condos (via splitterherzen)

(Source: headofporridge, via fuckyeahexistentialism)

asylum-art:

Jim Lambie

(sculpture David Batchelor)

James “Jim” Lambie is a contemporary visual artist, and was shortlisted for the 2005 Turner Prize with an installation called Mental Oyster. Jim Lambie graduated from the Glasgow School of Art with a Honors Bachelors of Arts degree.

The word “genius” is the nuclear weapon in the critic’s armoury. A lot of people think it should never be used. I used it a while ago and someone wrote to the Guardian complaining. I think they thought I was using it satirically - so rarely is this term employed and so dangerous is its aura.

Yet it has a venerable history. In Renaissance Europe the idea of the “genius” of the artist grew out of Neo-Platonic philosophy and the idea that creativity comes to the poet in a “fury”, a frenzy. From the start it identified artistic excellence with transports of mind. Albrecht Dürer may have been the first artist to see himself as a “genius”, portraying himself as a Christ-like messianic figure. Anyway I know a genius when I see one and the Glasgow artist Jim Lambie is a genius.
Text : The Guardian

(via asylum-art)


Superb Sunset Beach
superlinguo:

Have you ever found yourself in a foreign place, without knowledge of the local language and in need of a chicken leg? This travel tool has got you covered!
But seriously, beyond its usefulness to chicken connoisseurs, the Point It travel aid book (now also an app) seems quite nifty.
It’s a picture dictionary that contains images of 1300 common items to assist travellers with making themselves understood when they don’t know the local language. 
It’s not the only tool of its type - there a few other publishers who have similar versions of this type of wordless dictionary product on the market, as well. 
While some reviewers on online retail outlets say Point It’s value is diminished because it lacks an index, we note one reviewer on Amazon says:”I was in Umbria at a deli counter once and knew how to say that I wanted cheese, but didn’t know how to specify “goat” cheese. I pointed to the picture of a goat in “Point It” and my dilemma was instantly solved.”For our money, any tool that facilitates enjoyment of Umbrian goat’s cheese is worth its weight in gold.
And this online user review, from a speech pathologist, praises the book for its use outside travel:
"I am a speech pathologist and have actually had great success getting my aphasia patients to use it. It’s so portable and has such a vast array of items/ situations — it’s a perfect low-tech augmentative communication solution."
Have you used Point It or similar pictorial tools when you haven’t got the words you need? Did you find it useful? Hit us up in the comments or our ask box.

superlinguo:

Have you ever found yourself in a foreign place, without knowledge of the local language and in need of a chicken leg? This travel tool has got you covered!

But seriously, beyond its usefulness to chicken connoisseurs, the Point It travel aid book (now also an app) seems quite nifty.

It’s a picture dictionary that contains images of 1300 common items to assist travellers with making themselves understood when they don’t know the local language. 

It’s not the only tool of its type - there a few other publishers who have similar versions of this type of wordless dictionary product on the market, as well. 

While some reviewers on online retail outlets say Point It’s value is diminished because it lacks an index, we note one reviewer on Amazon says:

I was in Umbria at a deli counter once and knew how to say that I wanted cheese, but didn’t know how to specify “goat” cheese. I pointed to the picture of a goat in “Point It” and my dilemma was instantly solved.

For our money, any tool that facilitates enjoyment of Umbrian goat’s cheese is worth its weight in gold.

And this online user review, from a speech pathologist, praises the book for its use outside travel:

"I am a speech pathologist and have actually had great success getting my aphasia patients to use it. It’s so portable and has such a vast array of items/ situations — it’s a perfect low-tech augmentative communication solution."

Have you used Point It or similar pictorial tools when you haven’t got the words you need? Did you find it useful? Hit us up in the comments or our ask box.

(Source: sizvideos, via theflemface)

mentalalchemy:

I laughed too loudly at this

mentalalchemy:

I laughed too loudly at this

(Source: kidt82, via bbqequipmentfortheblind)

memeterprise:


wrecked
creeproll:

I’ve literally been laughing at this for the past five minutes

creeproll:

I’ve literally been laughing at this for the past five minutes

(Source: grantofalltrades, via bbqequipmentfortheblind)

algopop:

Animating Virtual Characters using Physics-Based Simulation by  Thomas Geijtenbeek

The PhD research of Geijtenbeek is about using Genetic Algorithms and physics simulation to train bipedal characters to walk.

"The total optimization time depends on the character model and the type of experiment; the number of evaluated generations varies between 500 and 3000. On a standard
PC, optimization time takes between 2 and 12 hours.”

Video embedded below:

(Source: sizvideos, via futurescope)

therumpus:

I have been saying this for years.

therumpus:

I have been saying this for years.

(Source: reparrishcomics)

(Source: feather-haired, via malefices)

nevver:

Art is just another form of screaming